Eczema

Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a chronic skin condition associated with a gene variation that impairs the skin´s ability to protect from bacteria, irritants, and allergens.

  • What is Eczema?
  • Eczema & cannabinoids
  • Text references, literature discussion
    & clinical trials

What is Eczema?

Definition
Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a chronic skin condition associated with a gene variation that impairs the skin´s ability to protect from bacteria, irritants, and allergens.1

Symptoms
Eczema varies greatly from individual to individual. In some individuals, eczema appears periodically and then clears up for some time. Commonly, eczema looks like red-, brown- or grayish patches.
The main symptoms of eczema may be:1

  • Dry skin
  • Flaky, thickened, or cracked skin
  • Raised small bums that may lead to fluid
  • Itchy skin resulting in raw, sensitive, and swollen skin from scratching

Cause
The function of healthy skin is to help retain moisture and shield against bacteria irritants and allergens. Eczema is associated with a gene variation that impairs the affected skin areas’ ability to provide these protections (i.e. against bacteria, irritants, and allergens). The risk factors that may increase the development of eczema are:1

  • Genetics
  • Allergies
  • Hay fever
  • Asthma
  • Cannabinoids
  • Cannabinoid receptors
  • Endocannabinoids

  • CBD
  • THC
  • THCV
  • Δ8THC
  • CBCV

  • CB1
  • CB2
  • PPARα
  • TRPV1

  • 2AG
  • Anandamide
  • PEA
  • Terpenes
  • Strains
  • Enzymes
  • Metabolites

Terpenes

Strains

Synthesizing & Degrading Enzymes

Metabolites

The connection between Eczema
& cannabinoids

Eczema hands itching scratching

Preclinical evidence proposes that the cannabinoids THC, CBD, THCV, CBCV, and Δ8THC may possess beneficial properties in the treatment of eczema.2

Note: If you have any further information relevant to the connection between Eczema and cannabinoids, or find any of the information inaccurate, outdated or incomplete please contact us here.

Text references, literature discussion
& clinical trials

  • Text references
  • Literature discussion
  • Clinical trials
Review

In a study with mice, it was shown that the levels of endocannabinoid AEA and suspected endocannabinoid PEA were elevated and TRPV1 and PPARα were upregulated (Petrosino et al., 2010). PEA is involved in enhancing the effect of AEA at CB1, CB2, and TRPV1 receptors and shielding against keratinocyte inflammation in a TRPV1-, but not CB1, CB2, or PPARα-dependent way.

In mice with Oxazolone-Induced Contact Dermatitis, it was found that the level of 2-AG was elevated, and inflammation was inhibited via CB2 receptors (Oka et al., 2006).

In another study with mice, it was shown that inflammation in allergic contact dermatitis was inhibited by CB1 and CB2 (Karsak et al., 2007).

Skin inflammation can be inhibited by THC topical application but in a CB1- and CB2-independent way (Gaffal et al., 2013).

References
Clinical trials

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