Cancer

Cancer is a group of diseases that involves the growth of abnormal cells which contain mutations, leading to uncontrollable cell division and growth. This can take place in any cell type and damage/destroy normal tissue.

  • What is Cancer?
  • Cancer & cannabinoids
  • Text references, literature discussion
    & clinical trials

What Is Cancer?

Definition
Cancer is a group of diseases that involves the growth of abnormal cells which contain mutations . leading to uncontrollable cell division and growth. This can take place in any cell type and damage/destroy normal tissue.

For patients, distinct treatments are based on the stage of cancer, the pattern of cell development, and symptoms that differ from patient to patient.

For more detailed information regarding specific cancer diseases and the treatment possibilities with cannabinoids, please read the individual entries from the list of diseases, or use the following links for:

  • Cannabinoids
  • Cannabinoid receptors
  • Endocannabinoids

  • CBD
  • THC

  • CB1
  • CB2
  • TRPV1
  • TRPV2

  • 2-AG
  • AEA
  • Terpenes
  • Strains
  • Enzymes
  • Metabolites

Terpenes

Strains

Synthesizing & Degrading Enzymes

Metabolites

The connection between Cancer
& cannabinoids

Cancer

Preclinical evidence proposes that the use of THC and CBD can be beneficial in the treatment of cancer symptoms such as pain and loss of appetite. These symptoms frequently occur with malignant growth of cancer cells or during the treatment of cancer disease.

Furthermore, THC and CBD can help in minimizing the risk of cancer cell division and support cancer cell apoptosis..

In addition, preclinical data suggest that cannabinoids may play a role in diminishing tumors-, cancer cell development- and metastasis besides relieving cancer symptoms and side effects of chemotherapy.  

Note: If you have any further information relevant to the connection between cancer and cannabinoids, or find any of the information inaccurate, outdated or incomplete please contact us here.

Text references, literature discussion
& clinical trials

  • Text references
  • Literature discussion
  • Clinical trials
Review

Several studies have shown that CBD as a multitarget molecule, functions as an adaptogen, as a modulator, and has antioxidant properties. In animal models, the progression of several cancer types was suppressed by CBD.  Furthermore, it has been found that an increase of autophagy and apoptosis in cancer cells is triggered by CBD and THC coadministration, followed by radiation therapy. CBD was also shown to play a role in suppressing cell proliferation and enhancing apoptosis in different types of cancer models. Studies in rodents have shown that CBD is involved in diminishing reactive gliosis, neuroinflammatory response and plays a role in promoting neurogenesis (Pellati et al., 2018).1

References

1. Pellati, Federica, et al. “Cannabis sativa L. and nonpsychoactive cannabinoids: their chemistry and role against oxidative stress, inflammation, and cancer.” BioMed research international2018 (2018).

Clinical Trials

A follow-up study included 43 patients with cancer-related pain to investigate the long-term safety and tolerability of THC/CBD spray and THC spray. It was demonstrated that the use of THC/CBD sprays reduced pain in patients with cancer. THC/CBD spray was found to be generally well-tolerated when using it in a long term. There is no evidence that the long-term use of THC/CBD spray has a loss of effect for the relief of cancer-related pain. In addition, patients did not attempt to increase this medication dose or other pain-relieving medication over time if they kept using the study medication. This proposes that the adjuvant use of cannabinoids could play a beneficial role in patients with cancer-related pain (Johnson et al., 2013).1

References

1. Johnson, Jeremy R., et al. “An open-label extension study to investigate the long-term safety and tolerability of THC/CBD oromucosal spray and oromucosal THC spray in patients with terminal cancer-related pain refractory to strong opioid analgesics.” Journal of pain and symptom management 46.2 (2013): 207-218.

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