Anorexia

Anorexia nervosa is a serious psychological- and eating disorder that leads to a distorted perception of body image, abnormally low body weight and an intense fear of gaining weight.

  • What is Anorexia?
  • Anorexia & cannabinoids
  • Text references, literature discussion
    & clinical trials

What is Anorexia?

Definition
Anorexia nervosa (commonly referred to just as anorexia) is a serious psychological- and eating disorder that leads to a distorted perception of body image, abnormally low body weight, and an intense fear of gaining weight.
The disorder interferes with most aspects of life as people who are suffering from anorexia often will take extreme actions to control their body weight.1

Symptoms
The signs and symptoms of anorexia can be both physical and emotional/behavioral.

Physical symptoms may include:

  • Extreme weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Insomnia
  • Fainting
  • Absence of menstruation

Emotional/behavioral symptoms may include:

  • Highly restrictive food consumption
  • Extreme exercise
  • Depression
  • Lack of sexual interest

Cause
Up to this date, the exact cause of anorexia is not yet known. However, it is suggested that a combination of biological, psychological, and environmental factors can play a role in the development of anorexia.1

  • Cannabinoids
  • Cannabinoid receptors
  • Endocannabinoids

  • THC
  • CBG

  • CB1

  • 2AG
  • Anandamide
  • Terpenes
  • Strains
  • Enzymes
  • Metabolites

Terpenes

Strains

  • FAAH

Metabolites

The connection between Anorexia
& cannabinoids

Anorexia Measurement Apple

Preclinical and clinical data suggest that the cannabinoid THC is a potent appetite stimulator that may be beneficial in the treatment of anorexia.2

In a pilot study, patients with anorexia nervosa reported that low doses of oral THC produced positive effects, including improvements in self-reported body care and depression.3

Note: If you have any further information relevant to the connection between Anorexia and cannabinoids, or find any of the information inaccurate, outdated or incomplete please contact us here.

Text references, literature discussion
& clinical trials

  • Text references
  • Literature discussion
  • Clinical trials
Review

Patients with anorexia have elevated levels of CB1 receptors in brains. Similarly, bulimia patients were also shown to have elevated levels of CB1 receptors in some brain regions (Gérard et al., 2011).

It was demonstrated that mutations in CB1 and FAAH (the major endocannabinoid degrading enzyme) are connected to anorexia and bulimia (Monteleone et al., 2009).

2AG and AEA play a role in controlling food intake (Fride, Bregman, & Kirkham, 2005).
Hyperphagia (excessive or extreme hunger) caused by CBG in animals does not produce negative neuromotor side effects (Brierley, Samuels, Duncan, Whalley, & Williams, 2016).

Likewise, CBG-BDS can help stimulate appetite, probably via CB1 (Brierley, Samuels, Duncan, Whalley, & Williams, 2017).

References
Clinical Trials

A randomized controlled trial aimed to assess the effect of dronabinol (a synthetic form of THC) on body weight in women with anorexia nervosa. It was found that dronabinol treatment produced a positive effect, causing a small but significant weight gain in anorexic women (Andries et al., 2014).

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